I’ll be reading new fiction at this event on Sunday, March 30. It’s at The Jam Factory in Bangkok. Come check it out if you are in the area. Show starts at 8pm. (41/2 The Jam Factory, Charoennakorn Rd., Klongsan Bangkok, Thailand 10600) (at The Jam Factory)

I’ll be reading new fiction at this event on Sunday, March 30. It’s at The Jam Factory in Bangkok. Come check it out if you are in the area. Show starts at 8pm. (41/2 The Jam Factory, Charoennakorn Rd., Klongsan Bangkok, Thailand 10600) (at The Jam Factory)

27 March 2014 · Comments

"If-" by Rudyard Kipling

If you can keep your head when all about you
Are losing theirs and blaming it on you,
If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you,
But make allowance for their doubting too;
If you can wait and not be tired by waiting,
Or being lied about, don’t deal in lies,
Or being hated, don’t give way to hating,
And yet don’t look too good, nor talk too wise:

If you can dream—and not make dreams your master;
If you can think—and not make thoughts your aim;
If you can meet with Triumph and Disaster
And treat those two impostors just the same;
If you can bear to hear the truth you’ve spoken
Twisted by knaves to make a trap for fools,
Or watch the things you gave your life to, broken,
And stoop and build ’em up with worn-out tools:

If you can make one heap of all your winnings
And risk it on one turn of pitch-and-toss,
And lose, and start again at your beginnings
And never breathe a word about your loss;
If you can force your heart and nerve and sinew
To serve your turn long after they are gone,
And so hold on when there is nothing in you
Except the Will which says to them: “Hold on!”

If you can talk with crowds and keep your virtue,
Or walk with Kings—nor lose the common touch,
If neither foes nor loving friends can hurt you,
If all men count with you, but none too much;
If you can fill the unforgiving minute
With sixty seconds’ worth of distance run,
Yours is the Earth and everything that’s in it,
And—which is more—you’ll be a Man, my son!

27 March 2014 · Comments

Paris Review - The Art of Poetry No. 18, Archibald MacLeish

"You begin to see that what is really going to happen is not that half a dozen but two, three, four poems, or maybe lines of poems, or fragments—some things may get shelved, shored up, or left behind. But left behind not alone but in a conjunction. So that you begin to think of yourself in terms of the others who were with you in this place—your contemporaries. “Oh living men, Remember me, Receive me among you.” And you realize that’s how you are really going to end up. You’re going to be part of that, of them. And finally you begin to think, that’s the way it ought to be. You ought to make the world fruitful that way. Rot! Leaving those fragments—those few poems that will be hard to get rid of." - Archibald MacLeish

Though there are parts that bug me—further romanticism of 1920’s era writers and MacLeish’s “I’m telling you how it ought to be” tone—this interview is packed with truth.

22 March 2014 · Comments

Imperial Nostalgias by Joshua Edwards #currentlyreading #poetry #onbreakfromprose

Imperial Nostalgias by Joshua Edwards #currentlyreading #poetry #onbreakfromprose

14 March 2014 · Comments

Currently Reading…

Li’s magnificent and jaw-droppingly grim novel centers on the 1979 execution of a Chinese counterrevolutionary in the provincial town of Muddy River and spirals outward into a scathing indictment of Communist China. Former Red Guard leader Shan Gu is scheduled to be executed after a denunciation ceremony presided over by Kai, the city’s radio announcer. At the ceremony, Shan doesn’t speak (her vocal chords have been severed), and before she’s shot, her kidneys are extracted—by Kai’s favor-currying husband—for transplant to a high regional official. After Shan’s execution, Kwen, a local sadist, and Bashi, a 19-year-old with pedophile leanings, bury Shan, but not before further mutilating the body. While Shan’s parents are bereft, others celebrate, including the family of 12-year-old Nini, born deformed after militant Shan kicked Nini’s mother in her pregnant belly. Nini dreams of falling in love and—in the novel’s intricate overlapping of fates—hooks up with Bashi, providing the one relatively positive moment in this panorama of cruelty and betrayal. Li records these events dispassionately and with such a magisterial sense of direction that the reader can’t help being drawn into the novel, like a sleeper trapped in an anxiety dream. (Publisher’s Weekly)

(Source: amazon.com)

9 March 2014 · Comments

About Me

My name is Donald Quist. I'm trying to become a better writer and human being. I have a predilection for expletives, moral dilemmas, ellipses, obscure pop-culture references and parenthetical statements. I currently live in Bangkok, Thailand. My collection of short stories is now available online and in a few independent bookstores. You can buy it on Amazon or by clicking that yellow button below.

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